Baohan Jiang’s deconstructed wardrobe aims to change our perception of time

Royal College of Art graduate Baohan Jiang has investigated the contents of the wardrobe to encourage users to reconsider how they structure, and experience, time.

Baohan Jiang's deconstructed wardrobe aims to change our perception of timeJiang constructed the wardrobe herself and painted it

The deconstructed, yet functional, wardrobe consists of a mirror and six pieces of clothing – an elongated shirt collar, two white gloves, a double-cuffed sleeve, a thin suitbag-like garment and a vest lined with plastic balls.

As well as making and sewing each of the clothing elements, Jiang also built the wardrobe by hand, cutting and welding pieces of metal tubing together before painting it.

Baohan Jiang's deconstructed wardrobe aims to change our perception of timeThe shirt sleeve with an additional cuff attached to the forearm is designed to emphasise the action of linking arms

The wardrobe and its contents are just one element of Jiang’s project, called The Moment. The designer uses these objects to explain her understanding of time as a series of physical experiences as opposed to linear time.

This alternative concept of time that Jiang refers to as “lived time” is a response to the “time crisis” in contemporary life – the pressure of fast-paced lifestyles.

Baohan Jiang's deconstructed wardrobe aims to change our perception of timeThe vest-like garment is lined with small plastic balls.

“During various research and interviews I conducted, I found that many citizens feel under heavy time pressure – they always feel like they are being rushed, and complain about the scarcity of time,” Jiang told Dezeen.

She hopes the wardrobe can help replace the daily question, “What should I wear today?” with “How should I spend my time today?”, suggesting that we can choose how we experience our time just like we pick out our clothes.

Baohan Jiang's deconstructed wardrobe aims to change our perception of timeOne glove represents the action of yawning. The other glove represents the various ways people hold their arms when resting in transit

Describing herself as a “time coach”, the graduate held a series of workshops where she used the wardrobe and its contents as props to help people understand the reality of “lived time”.

She invited people to choose a garment, and then wear it out in a public space during peak travel hours.

Each garment represents a different bodily “moment” that occurs during the daily commute, encouraging the wearer to concentrate on their own physical presence rather than what is happening around them.

Baohan Jiang's deconstructed wardrobe aims to change our perception of timeThe suitbag-like garment is intended to represent a clean state of dress

The elongated shirt collar represents eye contact. Concealing the wearer’s face, they can only see out if they lift the collar and peep through an integrated hole hidden underneath.

This aims to make users more aware of their own state of being by avoiding eye contact with others.

Baohan Jiang's deconstructed wardrobe aims to change our perception of timeThe elongated shirt collar represents eye contact

One glove represents the action of yawning. A large hole is sewn into the centre to mimic the breath left after people yawn with their hand covering their mouth.

The other glove represents the various ways people hold their arms when resting in transit. By sewing the tip of the index finger and thumb together, Jiang intends to mimic the gesture of clasping one hand over the other wrist.

The vest-like garment, lined with small plastic balls, is designed to intensify the impact of the slight brushes that occur when people rush past each other.

The shirt sleeve with an additional cuff attached to the forearm is designed to emphasise the action of linking arms with someone, while the suitbag-like garment is intended to represent a clean state of dress to highlight how people dress up each day.

Baohan Jiang's deconstructed wardrobe aims to change our perception of timeJiang uses the wardrobe to explain her understanding of time as a series of physical experiences as opposed to linear time

In a similar bid to provide respite to stressed city-dwellers, Royal College of Art graduate Amy Shao proposed converting a central London hospital into a hotel, which would naturally treat guests with herbs that sprout from the roof, ceiling and walls.

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