See the Empty Walls Where David Bowie’s Art Collection Used to Hang

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David Bowie's former apartment. Courtesy of the Corcoran Group.

David Bowie's former apartment. Courtesy of the Corcoran Group.

David Bowie’s former apartment. Courtesy of the Corcoran Group.

David Bowie's former apartment. Courtesy of the Corcoran Group.

David Bowie’s former apartment. Courtesy of the Corcoran Group.

David Bowie's former apartment. Courtesy of the Corcoran Group.

David Bowie’s former apartment. Courtesy of the Corcoran Group.

David Bowie's former apartment. Courtesy of the Corcoran Group.

David Bowie’s former apartment. Courtesy of the Corcoran Group.

David Bowie's former apartment. Courtesy of the Corcoran Group.

David Bowie’s former apartment. Courtesy of the Corcoran Group.

David Bowie's former apartment. Courtesy of the Corcoran Group.

David Bowie’s former apartment. Courtesy of the Corcoran Group.

The view from David Bowie’s former apartment. Courtesy of the Corcoran Group.

Just over a year after the world lost the great musician and artist David Bowie, a New York apartment that he once called home has come on the market for $6.5 million, reports Gothamist.

Of course, the apartment is no longer home to Bowie’s world-class art collection—Bowie and his wife, super model Iman, sold the three-bedroom, two-and-a-half-bath property back in 2002, after ten years of residency, and his art collection hit the auction block last year, bringing in a record $30 million at Sotheby’s London.

There’s no way of knowing, but the Essex House apartment might have once been home to Air Power by Jean-Michel Basquiat, which sold for £7.1 million ($8.8 million), and Frank Auerbach’s early Head of Gerda Boehm, which fetched a record £3.8 million ($4.7 million). The furniture could very well have included industrial design masterpieces by the Milan-based Memphis Group—over 100 pieces by the radical designers, including sofas and bookshelves, were included in the Sotheby’s sale.

Installation view of works by Memphis at the exhibition "Bowie/Collector" at Sotheby's London. Photo ©Sotheby’s.

Installation view of works by the Memphis Group at the exhibition “Bowie/Collector” at Sotheby’s London. Photo ©Sotheby’s.

There is one item remaining from Bowie’s days in residence included with the apartment, however: a Yamaha piano. “I would imagine it is hard to move but I think it’s really a great catch for buyers,” said Corcoran Group agent Bernice Leventhal, who is handling the sale, to ABC News. No word on the instrument’s independent value, however, as it’s not available for purchase unless you’re ready to pony up for the entire 1,877-square-foot home.

If you’re tempted, it’s worth noting there is also a walk-in closet, a bathroom with heated floors, and views of Central Park.

William Nicholson, Andalucian Homestead (1935). Courtesy of Sotheby's.

William Nicholson, Andalucian Homestead (1935).
Courtesy of Sotheby’s.

We can only imagine how much better it would have looked when Bowie lived there, paired with one of his 20th-century British artworks—perhaps Andalucian Homestead, a 1935 canvas by William Nicholson.

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